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Brent Sullivan
Brent Sullivan

How To Crack Wifi Password Mac ((NEW))


This manual show a manual to crack WiFi password from my MacBook Pro with MacOS 10.13 (HighSierra).I want to save the instruction to the future. If you want to repeat it you should familiar with console terminal.




How To Crack Wifi Password Mac



Perhaps the most troubling aspect of using WiFi networks it the security risks posed by a WiFi password hack. If an intruder was compromising your cabled network, there would be physical signs of the unauthorized access. If someone were trying to hack your WiFi password, there is a good chance you would never be aware that an attempt was made. An unscrupulous individual who understood how to hack WiFi passwords could be using your network to enact their own Internet access or gain entry into your network and electronic resources.


We believe that the best way to protect yourself against an intruder who wants to hack your WiFi is to know how to hack a WiFi password yourself. We are going to present a method to do just that by using your Mac computer and a freeware application called KisMAC.


We will be giving you a step-by-step overview of the steps required to use this method and will essentially show you how to hack into WiFi. We are not presenting this information with the intention of allowing others to hack into your Wifi. If that was their intention, there are plenty of other sites that will teach them what they want to know. Our aim is to show that it is feasible that your network could be under attack at this moment without any indication that someone is trying to hack your access password.


It preys on the fact that many wireless routers and networks are protected by very weak passwords. In some cases, there is no password or the user simply relies on the default, which can easily be found by knowing the model of the router in question.


In addition to the aforementioned KisMAC application, you will also use a collection of Linux tools known as Aircrack-ng. You also need a password file that contains the actual password of the network you are attacking. Files containing thousands or millions of the most commonly used passwords are available for download on the Internet.


Brute force attacks take a lot of time and as you can see, rely on the ability of a hacker to reproduce your password. A longer password will make your network substantially more secure. Using a machine that can generate 2 billion distinct keys per second, an 8 character password can be cracked in about 2.6 days, according to password-depot.de. Contrast this with the 7.5 million years required to crack a 12 character password and you can see the sense in using longer passwords.


If it has two step verification. then first you wont get access because you dont have the wifi key. and yes after spoofing mac you can run a dictionary attack and try to connect, unless the password is set by the user it self. If the password is automated by Admin PC or Router then it would be difficult to crack it using dictionary coz its too big, almost 15-20 characters all mix.


The combination of my past experience, a relatively new WiFi attack that I will explain momentarily, a new monster cracking rig (8 x QUADRO RTX 8000 48GB GPUs) in CyberArk Labs and the fact that WiFi is everywhere because connectivity is more important than ever drove me to research, whether I was right with my hypothesis or maybe just lucky.


In this blog, I demonstrate how easily (you do not need a cracking rig) and with little equipment unsecure WiFi passwords can be cracked, thus hacking the WiFi network .At the end, we will reveal statistics of the cracked hashes and explain how to defend your network from this type of attack. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that we know and understand the cracking method to form an adequate defense.


In simple English, if an adversary wanted to hack/crack a WiFi password, they need to be in the right place (between users and a router) at the right time (when users log in) and be lucky (users entered the correct password and all four packets were sniffed correctly).


Cracking the PMKID hash is ultimately just generating/calculating PMKs with the SSID and different passphrases, then calculating PMKID from the PMK and the other information we obtained. Once we generated a PMKID equal to the PMKID that was retrieved from the AP (Figure 3), the hash is cracked; the passphrases that were used to generate the right PMK that the PMKID was generated from is the correct WiFi password.


Each digit has 10 options (0-9), hence 10**8 possible combinations. One hundred million seems like a lot of combinations, but our monster rig calculates at the speed of 6819.8 kH/s which translates into 6,819,000 hashes per second.A cracking rig is not required as my laptop can get to 194.4 kH/s, which translates into 194,000 hashes per second. That equals more than enough computing power to cycle through the possibilities necessary to crack the passwords. Consequently, it took my laptop roughly 9 minutes to break a single WiFi password with the characteristics of a cellphone number. (10**8)/194,000 = 516 (seconds)/60 = 9 minutes.


The cracking speed for hashtypes differs because of different hash functions and the number of iterations. For example, PMKID is very slow compared to MD5 or NTLM. Nonetheless, it is feasible to crack a PMKID hash if the attacker focuses on a specific network, and the password is not complicated enough.


I hope you enjoyed this blog and that you will take the required steps to secure your WiFi network. And as a reminder, none of the passwords we cracked were used for unauthorized access to these WiFi networks or any other information accessible via these networks.


The problem is, if there's a lock next to the network name (AKA the SSID, or service set identifier), that indicates security is activated. Without a password or passphrase, you're not going to get access to that network, or the sweet, sweet internet that goes with it.


Perhaps you forgot the password on your own network, or don't have neighbors willing to share the Wi-Fi goodness. You could just go to a café, buy a latte, and use the "free" Wi-Fi there. Download an app for your phone like WiFi Map(Opens in a new window) (available for iOS(Opens in a new window) and Android(Opens in a new window)), and you'll have a list of millions of hotspots with free Wi-Fi for the taking (including some passwords for locked Wi-Fi connections if they're shared by any of the app's users).


It works because Windows creates a profile of every Wi-Fi network to which you connect. If you tell Windows to forget the network, it also forgets the password. In that case, this won't work. But few people ever explicitly do that.


In the new data that comes up, look under Security Settings for the line Key Content. The word displayed is the Wi-Fi password or key you are missing. (If you don't like the command line, there's third-party password recovering software like Cain & Abel(Opens in a new window) or WirelessKeyView (Opens in a new window)that can help you do the same thing.)


This won't work on someone else's Wi-Fi in the apartment next door. You need physical access to the router for this. However, before you do a full router reset simply to get on your own Wi-Fi, try to log into the router first. From there, you can easily reset a Wi-Fi password/key if you've forgotten it.


Once a router resets, you'll need that other username/password combo to access the router itself. Again, do this via a PC attached to the router via Ethernet; resetting the router probably killed any Wi-Fi connection for the moment. The actual access is typically done with a web browser, though many routers and whole home mesh systems now can be controlled via an app.


At this point, the router should then ask for that username and password (which, again, is probably not the same as the Wi-Fi SSID and network security key). Check your manual, assuming you didn't throw it away. Or go to RouterPasswords.com(Opens in a new window), which exists to tell people the default username/password on every router ever created. You'll need the router's model number in some cases, but not all.


You will quickly discern a pattern among router makers of utilizing the username of "admin" and a password of "password," so feel free to try those first. Since most people are lazy and don't change an assigned password, you could try those options even before hitting the reset button. Once you're in the Wi-Fi settings, turn on the wireless network(s) and assign strong-but-easy-to-recall passwords. After all, you don't want to share with neighbors without your permission.


Make that Wi-Fi password easy to type on a mobile device, too. Nothing is more frustrating than trying to get a smartphone connected to Wi-Fi with some cryptic, impossible-to-key-in-via-thumbs nonsense, even if it is the most secure password you've ever created.


You can run Kali Linux off a CD or USB key without even installing it to your PC's hard drive. It's free and comes with all the tools you'd need to crack a network. It even has an app for Windows in the Windows App Store(Opens in a new window).


Aircrack has been around for years, going back to when Wi-Fi security was only based on WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy). WEP was weak even back in the day; it was supplanted in 2004 by WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access).


Aircrack-ng(Opens in a new window) is labeled as a "suite of tools to assess Wi-Fi network security," so it should be part of any network admin's toolkit. It will take on cracking WEP and WPA-PSK keys. It comes with full documentation and is free, but it's not simple.


To crack a network, you need to have the right kind of Wi-Fi adapter in your computer, one that supports packet injection. You need to be comfortable with the command line and have a lot of patience. Your Wi-Fi adapter and Aircrack have to gather a lot of data to get anywhere close to decrypting the passkey on the network you're targeting. It could take a while.


Here's a how-to on doing it using Aircrack installed on Kali Linux(Opens in a new window) and another on how to use Aircrack to secure your network(Opens in a new window). Another similar option on the PC using the command line is Airgeddon(Opens in a new window).


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