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Vsevolod Bolshakov
Vsevolod Bolshakov

Download kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm for CentOS 8


- Explanation of the version number and the architecture H2: How to download kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm from CentOS repositories? - Prerequisites for downloading the package - Steps to download the package using yum or dnf commands H2: How to install kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm on your system? - Prerequisites for installing the package - Steps to install the package using rpm command H2: How to use kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm to build kernel modules? - Prerequisites for building kernel modules - Steps to build kernel modules using make command H2: How to update kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm to the latest version? - Prerequisites for updating the package - Steps to update the package using yum or dnf commands H2: How to uninstall kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm from your system? - Prerequisites for uninstalling the package - Steps to uninstall the package using rpm command H2: Conclusion - Summary of the main points of the article - Call to action for the reader Table 2: Article with HTML formatting What is kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm and why do you need it?




If you are a Linux user, you might have heard of the term "kernel". The kernel is the core component of the operating system that manages the hardware, processes, memory, and other resources. The kernel also provides an interface for user applications to interact with the system.




kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm download


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But what if you want to customize your kernel or add some functionality that is not available in the default kernel? For example, you might want to install a driver for a new device, or enable a feature that is not supported by your current kernel. In that case, you need to build a kernel module.


A kernel module is a piece of code that can be loaded into or unloaded from the running kernel without rebooting the system. Kernel modules can extend or modify the behavior of the kernel, or provide access to new hardware or software features.


To build a kernel module, you need some tools and files that are provided by the kernel-devel package. This package contains the kernel headers and makefiles that are required to compile and link your kernel module against the kernel source code.


The kernel-devel package has a specific version number and architecture that matches your running kernel. For example, if your kernel version is 4.18.0-80.el8 and your architecture is x86_64, then you need the kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm package.


In this article, we will show you how to download, install, use, update, and uninstall the kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm package on your CentOS 8 system.


How to download kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm from CentOS repositories?




The easiest way to download the kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm package is to use the yum or dnf commands. These commands are package managers that can automatically download and install packages from online repositories.


To use these commands, you need to have root privileges or sudo access on your system. You also need to have an active internet connection and access to the CentOS repositories.


To download the kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm package using yum, run the following command:


$ sudo yum install --downloadonly --downloaddir=/tmp/kernel-devel kernel-devel


This command will download the kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm package and save it in the /tmp/kernel-devel directory. You can change the directory to any location you prefer.


kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm install


kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm centos 8


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kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm dependencies


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kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm source


kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm update


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kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm headers


kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm modules


kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm patch


kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm changelog


kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm release notes


To download the kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm package using dnf, run the following command:


$ sudo dnf install --downloadonly --downloaddir=/tmp/kernel-devel kernel-devel


This command will do the same thing as the yum command, but using the dnf package manager instead.


How to install kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm on your system?




Once you have downloaded the kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm package, you can install it on your system using the rpm command. The rpm command is a low-level tool that can install, update, or remove packages from your system.


To use the rpm command, you need to have root privileges or sudo access on your system. You also need to know the exact location and name of the package file.


To install the kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm package using rpm, run the following command:


$ sudo rpm -ivh /tmp/kernel-devel/kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm


This command will install the kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm package on your system and display some progress information. The -i option stands for install, the -v option stands for verbose, and the -h option stands for hash marks.


If the installation is successful, you should see a message like this:


Preparing... ################################# [100%] Updating / installing... 1:kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8 ################################# [100%]


How to use kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm to build kernel modules?




After installing the kernel-devel-4.18.0-80.el8.x86_64.rpm package, you can use it to build kernel modules on your system. To do that, you need some additional tools and files that are provided by other packages.


The main packages that you need are:


  • gcc: The GNU Compiler Collection that can compile C and C++ code.



  • make: The GNU Make tool that can automate the building process.



  • bzip2: The bzip2 compression utility that can extract compressed files.



  • kmod: The kmod library and tools that can manage kernel modules.



  • kpatch-build: The kpatch-build tool that can create live kernel patches.



  • kpatch-utils: The kpatch-utils tools that can apply live kernel patches.



  • pesign: The pesign tool that can sign kernel modules with a certificate.



  • mokutil: The mokutil tool that can manage Machine Owner Keys (MOKs) for Secure Boot.



  • makedumpfile-kpatch: The makedumpfile-kpatch tool that can dump memory contents of a patched kernel.



  • kexec-tools-kpatch: The kexec-tools-kpatch tools that can load a patched kernel into memory and execute it.



  • kpatch-dnf-plugin: The kpatch-dnf-plugin plugin that can automatically update live kernel patches using dnf.



  • kpatch-yum-plugin: The kpatch-yum-plugin plugin that can automatically update live kernel patches using yum.



  • kpatch-zypper-plugin: The kpatch-zypper-plugin plugin that can automatically update live kernel patches using zypper.



  • kpatch-cronjob: The kpatch-cronjob script that can periodically check for available live kernel patches and install them.



To install these packages, you can use the yum or dnf commands as follows:


$ sudo yum install gcc make bzip2 kmod kpatch-build kpatch-utils pesign mokutil makedumpfile-kpatch kexec-tools-kpatch kpatch-dnf-plugin kpatch-yum-plugin kpatch-zypper-plugin kpatch-cronjob


$ sudo dnf install gcc make bzip2 kmod kpatch-build kpatch-utils pesign mokutil makedumpfile-kpatch kexec-tools-kpatch kpatch-dnf-plugin kpatch-yum-plugin kpatch-zypper-plugin kpatch-cronjob


Once you have installed these packages, you can use the make command to build your kernel module. To do that, you need to have the source code of your kernel module in a directory. You also need to have a Makefile that specifies how to compile and link your kernel module.


A typical Makefile for a kernel module looks something like this:


obj-m := mymodule.o KDIR := /usr/src/kernels/$(shell uname -r) PWD := $(shell pwd) default: $(MAKE) -C $(KDIR) M=$(PWD) modules clean: $(MAKE) -C $(KDIR) M=$(PWD) clean


This Makefile defines a variable obj-m that contains the name of your kernel module object file. It also defines two variables KDIR and PWD that point to the directory of the kernel source code and the directory of your kernel module source


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